Nutrition and Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a disease that affects the bones.  It is a condition of decreasing bone mass that causes the bones to become porous and brittle. Osteoporosis “literally means ‘porous bone’.  This disease is characterized by too little bone formation, excessive bone loss, or a combination of both, leading to fragility and an increased risk of fracture of the hip, spine, and wrist.”

Our bodies are constantly repairing and rebuilding tissue, bones being one of them.  From birth through young adulthood, in most cases, we have the ability to regenerate healthy bones.  As we progress through middle age, our bodies start losing the ability to regenerate and repair tissue, quickly making it difficult to build new strong bones.  By the time women are post-menopausal, estrogen, a hormone responsible for bone health, declines.  Osteoporosis is more prevalent in post-menopausal women, however, it can also affect elderly men.

Are There Any Symptoms For Osteoporosis?  

There usually are no symptoms associated with osteoporosis which makes it hard to detect.  As the disease progresses, you may notice you’re getting shorter and or see your upper spine area becoming more rounded and bulging. Many times people don’t know they have the disease until there’s been a fracture or through a bone mineral density test.  It’s been named the silent disease for that reason.

What Causes Osteoporosis?  

1 – Lifestyle habits such as not getting enough movement or exercise regularly, smoking, and alcohol consumption.

2 – Poor nutrition – eating the Standard American Diet which is high in processed foods.

3 – It can be hereditary.  Studies have shown that certain genes play a large role in developing osteoporosis.2

Other Risk factors are:

1 – Not getting enough sunlight.  Our bodies naturally produce Vitamin D from being in the sunlight.  

  • Vitamin D is actually a hormone produced in the kidneys which controls the blood calcium concentration
  • Vitamin D is important for calcium absorption

2 – Smoking – smoking affects the absorption of calcium by reducing the blood supply to the bones

3 – Drinking alcohol daily or excessively is believed to be correlated with slowing the production of bone mass.  

Nutrition, the Bad and the Good

Nutrition can be tricky when it comes to knowing what to eat for certain medical conditions.  While some foods to avoid eating are obvious, like candy bars, ice cream, and French fries, other foods may surprise you.  For example, beans, legumes, whole grains, spinach, beet greens, and soy are all a great part of a healthy diet due to the many nutrients they offer our bodies.  Here’s the caveat. Those foods I just listed contain phytates and oxalates which may have an effect on bones. Beans, legumes and whole grains contain phytates which are antioxidant compounds found in these foods that bind to certain essential minerals and can decrease their absorption of calcium.  While it’s fine and important to continue eating beans, legumes and whole grain, it’s best to soak them for at least 12 hours to decrease the amount of phytates.  

Oxalate containing foods are spinach, beets, chard, nuts and nut butters.  Oxalates are compounds that can also interfere with the absorption of calcium.  Steaming or boiling these foods helps to reduce the oxalates.

You can greatly reduce your risk of osteoporosis or stop its progression if you’ve already been diagnosed with it by changing certain lifestyle habits.   Include more weight bearing exercise, stop smoking, stop drinking alcohol, and get out in the sun daily for a few minutes. The adoption of a diet of whole, mostly plant based foods in all the colors of the rainbow should have you on the road to stop the progression of osteoporosis.

 

There are a number of charts reproduced below which will help you decide how to make dietary adjustments.

 

Foods to Avoid Why
Alcohol Poor calcium & Vitamin D absorption affecting the liver
Salt High salt intake increase calcium in the urine which means less bone rebuilding
All Processed Foods Need I say more? Many processed foods are high in sodium and other chemicals that leech calcium from the bones.

 

Protein from Animals

Including Meat & Dairy

Meat and dairy are acidic.  Our bodies are always working towards being in more alkaline. When there’s to much acidity in the body, calcium will help to neutralize the body.  In order for that to happen, calcium is taken from the bones which can weaken the bone
Caffeine in coffee, dark tea and dark sodas Drinking these beverages will allow your bones to lose its ability to absorb calcium and magnesium.

 

Look in the chart below to see which foods contain these essential vitamins and minerals to promote bone health.  These foods contain some of the highest amounts of plant-based calcium. Magnesium, Manganese, zinc, Vitamin D, Vitamin C, Vitamin K are minerals and vitamins that work synergistically to maintain and support bone health.  

 

Healthy Food Vitamin/Mineral Important for Osteoporosis Best way to cook for nutrient content
Beans, Legumes & Whole Grains Beans have essential minerals such as calcium and magnesium and fiber.  They also have phytates which decrease calcium absorption. Soak Beans for at least 12 hours. Drain then rinse.  Place 1 tbsp of apple cider vinegar or one piece of Kombu seaweed in cooking water.  This will help reduce flatulence.
Broccoli Vit K-which helps prevent fractures by increasing BMD

Vit C- aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Manganese- also plays a vital role in the production of collagen

Magnesium – known for bone metabolism and maintaining sufficient calcium

Calcium – key mineral for maintaining bone structure

Vit D – key for maintaining bone structure

Steam for no longer than 4 minutes

to preserve the nutrients

Brussel

Sprouts

Vitamins K-which helps prevent fractures by increasing BMD

C- aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Magnesium – known for bone metabolism and maintaining sufficient calcium

Calcium- key mineral for maintaining bone structure

Steam for no longer than 5 minutes to preserve the nutrients
Carrots Vitamins K-which helps prevent fractures by increasing BMD

Vit C- aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Manganese- also plays a vital role in the production of collagen

Steam for no longer than 5 minutes to preserve the nutrients
Cauliflower Vit C – aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Vit K-which helps prevent fractures by increasing BMD

Manganese- also plays a vital role in the production of collagen

Magnesium- known for bone metabolism and maintaining sufficient calcium

Steam for no longer than 5 minutes to preserve the nutrients
Kale Vitamins K – which helps prevent fractures by increasing BMD

C – aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Manganese- also plays a vital role in the production of collagen

Calcium- key mineral for maintaining bone structure

Magnesium- known for bone metabolism and maintaining sufficient calcium

Steam for no longer than 5 minutes to preserve the nutrients
Collard Greens Vit K – which helps prevent fractures by increasing BMD

Vit C- aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Manganese – also plays a vital role in the production of collagen

Calcium – key mineral for maintaining bone structure

Magnesium – known for bone metabolism and maintaining sufficient calcium

Steam for no longer than 5 minutes to preserve the nutrients
Naval Oranges Vit C – aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Calcium- key mineral for maintaining bone structure

Wash, peel and eat.  Store at room temp for up to 5 days or in the Fridge for up to 10 days
Raisins Vit K- which helps prevent fractures by increasing BMD

Vit C – aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Manganese- also plays a vital role in the production of collagen

Magnesium – known for bone metabolism and maintaining sufficient calcium

Buy organic and enjoy eating raw
Blueberries Vit K- which helps prevent fractures by increasing BMD

Vit C- aids in the production collagen which is a protein that plays a role in bone structure

Manganese also plays a vital role in the production of collagen

Calcium – key mineral for maintaining bone structure

Magnesium – known for bone metabolism and maintaining sufficient calcium

Wash and eat.

 

Nov 2018 Maryanne Riege, Certified Holistic Health Coach, works with adults and children age 16 and over assisting, supporting, and directing people on their journey toward a healthy lifestyle and diet.  Schedule an appointment by calling 262.695.5311.

 

How Well Do You Know Beans?

Beans are packed with tons of fiber, as well as plenty of iron and protein. They are rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients. They are low in calories. Plus, studies have found them to lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Who could ask for a more perfect food?

Creamy cannellini, meaty garbanzos, sweet adzuki, tender pintos, and so many more—beans are one of the most powerful, nutrient-dense plant foods around. The sweeter the bean, such as black-eyed, adzuki, lentils, and mung, the easier it is to digest. Beans like lima, navy and soybeans tend to be harder to digest because of a complex sugar called oligosaccharides which need an enzyme call alpha galactosidase that humans do not produce to properly break them down.

Recipe Ideas for Beans

Many people avoid beans because they just don’t know what to do with them.

  • Toss beans and diced veggies (such as celery, shallots, red peppers) with vinaigrette for a quick bean salad.
  • Blend cooked beans with tomatoes, onions, and your favorite seasonings to create a yummy bean soup.
  • Top a green salad with 1/3 cup of your favorite bean.
  • Puree beans with a bit of olive oil, a garlic clove, salt, and your favorite seasonings. Voila! A fast dip or sandwich spread.
  • Include 1/3 cup of beans with your other favorite toppings next time you make stuffed baked potatoes or sweet potatoes.
  • Add 1/4 cup pureed beans to your favorite pancake, waffle, muffin, or cake recipe. You’ll be surprised at how moist and springy baked goods are when baked with beans.

If you’re new to cooking with dried beans, try these tips for delicious and well-cooked beans.

  • Be sure to wash and clean the dried beans first.
  • Soak dried beans for 8-12 hours before cooking (hint: cut a bean in half; if the center is still opaque, keep soaking).
  • After soaking, rinse, fill pot with fresh water, bring to a boil, then skim off the foam
  • To aid digestion, add kombu, bay leaf, cumin, anise, or fennel to the water
  • Cover and simmer for the suggested time
  • Remember: Only add salt at the end of cooking (about 10 minutes before the beans are done) or it will interfere with the cooking process

Quick tips: For speedier prep, boil dried beans for 5 minutes, then soak for 2-4 hours. Or use canned beans instead (some people find them even easier to digest!). Be sure to avoid canned beans with added salt or preservatives and rinse thoroughly once removed from the can. Also buy cans that are BPA Free. Bisphenol A is found in the hard plastic bottles and cans many people use every day. It can

I’ve included a recipe for Italian White Bean Soup in a nother post, one of my favorite soup recipes.  It’s so tasty and easy to make; perfect for this time of year.   

Italian White Bean Soup

 

Italian White Bean Soup


Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp extra-virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 clove garlic thinly sliced
  • ¼ C onion chopped
  • 30 oz can cannellini beans white kidney beans; or use cooked, dried beans prepared according to instructions.
  • 1-1/2 C water
  • 1-1/2 Tsp dried sage crushed
  • ½ Tsp dried basil crushed
  • ½ Tsp sea salt
  • ¼ C celery chopped
  • ¼ C carrots chopped
  • ½ C fresh spinach
  • 1/8 Tsp black Pepper

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in large saucepan, saute the onions and garlic for 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add celery, carrots, sage, basil, beans, water, and sea salt.
  3. Cover, bring to a boil and then simmer for 15-20 minutes

  4. Add black pepper and spinach and simmer an additional 2 minutes

  5. (If you wish, you may puree the soup in a blender before adding pepper and spinach.)

To Soy, or Not to Soy, That Is the Question

Many of my clients ask me “what about eating soy? Is it safe?”  And the answer is YES, as long as it’s Non-GMO and organic such as in edamame, soy milk, tofu, and tempeh.  Over the past decade, there’s been controversy regarding soy consumption such as it being a hormone disruptor.  There are arguments on both sides, however, most recent research finds that eating soy, a whole food, is beneficial nutritionally.  

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine puts out Fact Sheets through which the committee experts review and author information to help people understand and thrive on plant-based diets. I found an article entitled Soy and Health that I think includes some of the best answers to the question of whether or not to consume soy.  Here’s the link to the Physicians Committee website; there’s a lot of great information there, but scroll through until you find the pdf entitled Soy and Health.> https://pcrm.widencollective.com/portals/gr0kpkol/factsheets

To eat healthfully, eat a variety of vegetables, fruits, beans and legumes such as soybeans!  

Here is a quick, no-cook and nutrient-rich way to prepare soybeans:

1 -15 oz organic can (non BPA)* or frozen bag shelled soybeans, thawed

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

Sea salt and pepper, to taste

Mix all the ingredients and enjoy!

Detox Orientation Meetings – Free

Have you decided or has your doctor recommended that you begin transforming your health with a short-term, detox, diet program?  Does the program require a different way of eating that’s confusing or consists of foods you don’t normally consume? Our Health Coach, Maryanne Riege, can help with that.

Trying to get information about detoxing can be overwhelming and frustrating.  There is so much conflicting information, it’s almost impossible to know what is right and what is not.  

Maryanne is offering free, one-hour informational sessions that will provide guidance and reduce your anxiety.  During the orientation meeting, the confusion about detoxing will be addressed.

The session will address the following:

  • What is a whole food plant based detox?
  • How to detox successfully.
  • How to participate in a guided program, with tips and recipes.

Participation is free, but requires RSVP at least two days before the event

(Minimum participant enrollment required)

INFO SESSION DATES:

September 20, 2018    5:30-6:30PM

October 4, 2018     10:30-11:30AM

October 18, 2018      5:30-6:30PM

November 1, 2018 .    10:30-11:30AM

November 15, 2018     5:30-6:30PM

December 6, 2018 .    10:30-11:30AM

 

Get ready for a program that will lead to the health and wellness you desire!

 

To enroll – call our office at 262.695.5311

Plant Based Dinner – September 27

What is a whole food plant-based diet?  It’s a diet based on foods derived from plants, including vegetables, whole grains, legumes and fruits, but with few or no animal products.  Plant-based diets help prevent chronic disease like diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and improve skin and gut health. Do you want to experience and learn more about how to thrive on a plant-strong diet?  Then this is the opportunity for you. You will be served a delicious and nutritious plant-based meal that will leave you with a feeling of happiness and satiety.

 

When:  Thursday, September 27

Where:  The Ommani Center for Integrative Medicine

Time:  5:30-7:30pm

Cost:  $20/person fee collected at the door

 

RSVP Deadline:   262-695-5311 or via email: ommani@ommanicenter.com by Tuesday, Sept 25

Cooking Class at Public Market – October 17th

with Dr. Kumar and Maryanne Riege
October 17th
5:30pm
$29
Let Dr. Kumar and Maryanne Riege show you how to make food your medicine. Join them at the Milwaukee Public Market kitchen for a demonstration.

The Medicinal Qualities of Dill

Who would have thought this tangy herb would have so many health benefits! Dill also has quite the history. Dill was used by Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, for cleaning the mouth. Charlemagne made it available on his banquet tables, so his guests who indulged too much could benefit from its carminative properties (in the event you don’t know, a carminative is a drug that relieves flatulence).

Benefits of Dill Include:

  • Promotes Digestion – its oils also stimulate peristaltic motion of the intestine, easing the passage of bowel movements and relieving constipation.
  • The flavonoids and vitamin-B complex present in its essential oils, activate the secretion of certain enzymes and hormones which have calming and hypnotic effects, thereby helping people get a good night’s sleep.
  • The calcium content of dill means that it is an important element in protecting you from bone loss and the loss of bone mineral density.
  • The essential oils of dill are anti-congestive and antihistaminic in nature. They help clear congestion in the respiratory system due to histamines, allergies, or coughs.

With picnic season right around the corner, see a healthy potato salad recipe using dill from Fork’s Over Knives in our recipe section!

Mmmm…Chocolate

Chocolate is the only ingredient that is its very own food group…well not really—but it seems as if it should be. Powerfully comforting, creamy, delicious—many people eat chocolate at least several times a week.

And you ask. . . Is Chocolate Good for You?

The answer is both yes and no.

Chocolate has been used for centuries to treat bronchitis, fatigue, hangovers, anemia, depression, memory loss, high blood pressure, poor eyesight, and more. It also helps release that feel-good neurotransmitter—serotonin—in the brain.

But eat the wrong kind, as in milk chocolate, and you’ll get loads of sugar, calories, and junky ingredients.

How to Eat it Responsibly

Chocolate begins life as raw cacao (pronounced kah-kow) beans. Loaded with antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, and plant phenols – cacao is a powerful superfood. The more processed cacao becomes, however—think commercially produced candy bars—the fewer healthy components remain.  Adults and kids alike are crazy about chocolate, and for good reason! It’s a delicious treat and seems to make the day a little better. In fact, if eating chocolate seems to put you in a better mood, you aren’t imagining it—chocolate really can improve feelings of well-being and your overall mood!

So how to get the most out of your chocolate fix?

  • Don’t be afraid of the dark. The darker the chocolate, the more beneficial cacao it contains.
  • Know your percentages: the number on dark chocolate packaging refers to the percentage of cacao bean in chocolate. For maximum health benefit, look for dark chocolate that has 75% to 85% cacao.
  • Go raw—or as unprocessed as possible.

So, don’t live in deprivation. You can eat your chocolate and still be healthy. Check out this website for a list of healthy dark chocolate. https://healthyeater.com/dark-chocolate-best-and-worst

In Good Health,

Maryanne

Apr2018 Maryanne Riege, Certified Holistic Health Coach, works with adults and children age 16 and over assisting, supporting, directing people on their journey toward a healthy lifestyle and diet.  Schedule an appointment by calling 262.695.5311.

 

Powerful Plant Protein (Plus Cooking Tips!)

How well do you know beans?  Creamy cannellinis, meaty garbanzos, sweet adzuki, tender pintos, and so many more—beans are one of the most powerful, nutrient-dense plant foods around.

Consider this:

Beans are packed with tons of fiber, as well as plenty of iron and protein. They are rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients. They are low in calories. Plus, studies have found them to lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

What To Do With Beans:

Many people avoid beans because they just don’t know what to do with them. Are you one of those people?

Keep reading:

  • Toss beans and diced veggies (such as celery, shallots, red peppers) with vinaigrette for a quick bean salad.
  • Blend cooked beans with tomatoes, onions, and your favorite seasonings to create a yummy bean soup.
  • Top a green salad with 1/3 cup of your favorite bean.
  • Puree beans with a bit of olive oil, a garlic clove, salt, and your favorite seasonings. Voila! A fast dip or sandwich spread.
  • Include 1/3 cup of beans with your other favorite toppings next time you make stuffed baked potatoes or sweet potatoes.
  • Add 1/4 cup pureed beans to your favorite pancake, waffle, muffin, or cake recipe. You’ll be surprised at how moist and springy baked goods are when baked with beans.

If you’re new to cooking with beans, try these tips for delicious and well-cooked beans.

  • Be sure to wash and clean the beans first.
  • Soak dried beans for 8-12 hours before cooking (hint: cut a bean in half; if the center is still opaque, keep soaking).
  • After soaking, rinse, fill the pot with fresh water, bring to a boil, then skim off the foam.
  • To aid digestion, add kombu, bay leaf, cumin, anise, apple cider vinegar or fennel to the water, cover and simmer for the suggested time.
  • Remember: Only add salt at the end of cooking (about 10 minutes before the beans are done) or it will interfere with the cooking process.
  • Quick tips: For speedier prep, boil dried beans for 5 minutes, then soak for 2-4 hours. Or use canned beans instead (some people find them even easier to digest!). Be sure to avoid canned beans with added salt or preservatives and rinse thoroughly once removed from the can.

GET EVEN HEALTHIER!

Would you like help learning how to choose and cook healthy foods like beans? Curious about how health coaching can help you make your own healthy changes? Let’s talk! Schedule an initial consultation with me today——or pass this offer on to someone you care about!

 

Mar2018 Maryanne Riege, Certified Holistic Health Coach, works with adults and children age 16 and over assisting, supporting, directing people on their journey toward a healthy lifestyle and diet.  Schedule an appointment by calling 262.695.5311.